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20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
it would have no choice but to default on some big bills, the ceo of walmart told congress today the squabbling here in washington could have a huge negative impact nationwide on an all fragile recovery. >> a default and the ripple effect i think would be impactful and representing our consumers, we think that that would be very, very difficult for the american economy to withstand at this point in time in our history. >> that's here at home. >>> then there are global worries. concerns that a default or even a close call here could rattle international markets and international economies like that domino effect back after the big wall street meltdown a few years ago. >> the united states is the largest economy in the world, one that matters, one that has spillover effects, not just around the borders, but on a complete basis, globally. >> so, the stakes, they're obvious. the path to the solution, however, not nearly as clear. >> is it today, is it tomorrow, is it friday? magic things can happen here in congress in a very short period of time under the right circumstances. >> now,
the cia gets caught up in this big debate about how to interrogate what to do. >> they say it's tough. anytime they operate outside of iraq and afghanistan in battlefields it becomes murkier. they say they're faced with the question of can he go back to the u.s. and be tried? that has to go through several agencies. can he have a third-party that take him when neither of the two are available, they would be forced to let someone go. >> the obama administration's treatment of the somali terrorist suspect isn't sitting well with lawmakers on capitol hill. among them lindsey graham of south carolina. >> we learned this morning that a gentleman was taken into custody, kept on a u.s. ship and he's now in custody. >> the last thing i'm worried about is prosecuting enemy fighters. i want to find out what they know about the enemy, what intelligence value do they have to the united states. having people on ships has never been used in warfare before in terms of prisons. he should have been sent to guantanamo bay and held as an enemy combatant and interrogated. >> the administration would make
tennessee. can they sell it to the house republicans? >> that's a big question. i think what we saw today both from president obama and someone like lamar alexander is this isolation that going on of the house republicans, saying, look, the gang of six got a deal, that's why president obama went out this to say it. mitch mcconnell's got a backup plan. john boehner and i were kind of working together and, well, who's out of that picture? the house republicans. and the polls are increasingly showing that the house republican point of view is not popular with the american public. i mean, there's a "washington post" out -- poll out tonight that says that more than three-quarters of americans see the republican leadership as being too resistant. >> however, however, let's listen as we go back to kate bolduan on the hill, the democrats are reading the polls. the democratic leadership going to the floor essentially saying, republicans, why are you wasting our time? >> the public has had it with this theater of the absurd that's going on. they want congress to come together as our president has s
just another decision to push big problems down the road? let's begin there with fareed zakaria. you would think the possibility that the united states would default on its obligations for the first time in history you would think would bring a grown-up conversation to washington, it would be that. but? >> it's truly bizarre, john, because what it seems that republicans are not focussing on is the fact that were the united states to default, were there to be a danger it would default, america's interests costs would go up dramatically. if we were to, say, have a 1% rise in our borrowing costs, that markets got scared that we were not going to make good on our payments and our borrowing costs went up 1%, that's $150 billion more that we have to spend every year on our interest payments on our debt. and this is very important. if we do this for a week or two and still resolve things once markets get scared, it takes a long time for those interest rates to come down. just look at any case in history where there has been a default. once you have a crisis, even if you settle your book, yo
news for the administration. here is the big question, where are the jobs? you see jobs started to go up in a better rate, but the last two months, very bleak. consider this, even if the economy added 125,000 jobs a month, 125,000 jobs a month, between now and the election next year, that would keep the unemployment rate flat lined, right around 9.2%. the president, if he wants the rate to go down needs dramatic improvement in the jobs climate and need it is quickly. one more here, pretty sobering if you look at it the government 14.1le million unemployed, half of them long term. add in those underemployed, people who can only find a part-time job, about 22.7 million people hurt and hurt badly by this economy. let's dig deeper, chief white house correspondent jessica yellin and in new york where traders on wall street literally gasped when the report was released. jess, to you first, hard enough for the president, facing re-election, the unemployment rate is stubborn in the middle of this, trying to get a deficit reduction deal. you have reaction to the jobs report, release this, this
said it was going to -- said it was going to. here's why it's such a big problem. because of speaker boehner, he said there's one major principle, you'll remember, jessica, as they moved forward to raise the debt ceiling, that the amount of the cuts be greater than the amount they raised the debt ceiling. and in this legislation right now is called for raising the debt ceiling by $900 billion, $850 billion, is less than $900 billion, so know that's a problem. policy aides are scrambling to try to rewrite the legislation to make their way forward. we know they're aiming for a vote tomorrow, but we don't know if they can promise it quite yet. we got a speaker from speaker boehner's spokesman, this coming from michael steele, in response, in reaction to the cbo, michael steele said we're here to change washington, no more spoke and mirrors or phantom cuts. we promised we'd cut more than the debt ceiling. as we speak, congressional, are looking at options to rewrite the legislation to meet our pledge. this is what can happen when you have an actual plan and submit all it really seemed to
house republicans. but there's a big problem. neither of those plans may be able to get through congress and the clock is ticking. cnn congressional correspondent kate boulwan joins us now. let's start in the house where speaker john boehner has laid out his version of the republican solution. spell it out for us. >> reporter: a lot of details to it, jessica, but what it really comes down to is the length of the increase, if you will. house speaker john boehner is calling for two votes in order to raise the debt ceiling. first, a vote that would come with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts to get the country through early next year and another vote would be required that would get the to 2013. but only if, and this is the important part, if congress would approve the spending cuts attached to that, or the deficit reduction measures attached to that that would come from a newly created committee, and that of course is the big hangup with democrats. they are very much opposed to having to vote for a second time to raise the debt ceiling. they say it risks us returning to exactly where we are t
failed to make its case. >> the prosecution did not prove their case. the big question that was not answered, how did caylee die? i think there was probably a lot of discussion of it being a horrific accident that dad and casey covered up. unfortunately, it did snowball and got away from them. >> jeff toobin, we've had this conversation before in high profile cases. does sunny have a point? one big trial i covered was the von bullough count. they tried to get seven counts. should they have taken one or two counts that they thought they had a stronger case on and focus there? >> it's not the number of counts, john. it's the death penalty. this was from the start not a case that cried out for the death penalty. there was so many holes in the evidence. where did she die? how did she die? what day did she die? none of this the prosecution knew. there were no eyewitnesses to the murder, as sunny said, the issue of motive was murky. in a lot of all that, some sort of accidental homicide would seem to have been a much more plausible theory. interestingly the alternate juror we
republicans there's frustration that the democrats aren't putting enough on the table. the big picture is that the clock is ticking and these talks aren't bearing fruit. they don't seem to be locking down agreements and moving on to the next big issue which is what we call progress. they need to be making progress if they're going to have a deal any time soon. >> yes, it does require progress to get a deal. let's dig a little deeper here. jess just mentioned there seems to be a tug of war within the house republican congress. john boehner was talking about this grand bargain, $4 trillion over ten years deficit reduction package, that would have required some new rev news. some of us call those new taxes in washington, d.c. listen to the speaker today, it sounds like he's getting a little tougher. >> my message to the white house over the last several months has been real simple. the spending cuts have to be larger than the increase in the debt ceiling. secondly, there are no tax increases on the table. and thirdly, we have to have real control in place to make sure this never happens a
tonight, the house speaker john boehner i'm told is telling president obama he's open to discussing a big deficit reduction package, somewhere in the ballpark of $3 trillion over ten years. but first, though, speaker boehner said it's imperative that his members telling him the senate vote first on the house plan, cut, cap, and balance, if it fail fails, then look for th negotiations to continue. >>> key elements of the republican establishment are trying to nudge the hard line conservatives to a compromise. defaulting on our debt is not an option. it has real, immediate, and potentially catastrophic consequences. the ratings agency standard and poor's sent a team to capitol hill saying not raising the debt ceiling would stain america's credit rating and drive up interest costs for everyone. many house conservatives, though, aren't ready to give up and some of them won't budge. they say if there's any new taxes in this deal at the end, they would rather have the first default in american history. >>> in our new cnn/orc poll gives us a fresh sense of what you think. 34% of americans say an
has to go that, would have a big devastating impact on assad. there is a sense in washington that not only is assad not going to reform, but the opposition is toughening up. yes, it's not united, but is persistent as every friday. soon not far away in august comes ramadan. during ramadan in august, every day is a friday. >> i realize these sort of repeated warnings from the u.s. give heart to the protestors, send signals to our allies in the region. i wonder if there is any down side to repeated warnings that don't have an "or else" to them. >> that is an interesting question. my sense of what's been reported out of the state department, they are reluctant to get specific to say assad must go because they do not think they have the capacity to get him out of there. they don't want the united states looking like a paper tiger with regard to syria. we had enough problems trying to get gadhafi to go. right now i think the united states is in a waiting game, trying to toughen sanctions, harden up the rhetoric, seeing if others will join and recognizing these protestors are not go
the c. and he appeared to be picking up the votes. lesson to shawn duffy. >> is this as big as we wanted to go? heck, no. we wanted to go bigger. we ran on going bigger. but this is the only proposal on the table that accomplishes the goals that we set out to do. >> progress but apparently and this is why we have such a drama unfolding on capitol hill, not enough progress. the speaker is still short the votes. he's delayed the key vote, a key vote to not only if you are sitting at home, maybe you think the debt ceiling should be raised, maybe you should, it's a fundamentally important political showdown, some people think the speaker's hold on his job could be in jeopardy if he loses this vote. let's go to kate bolduan, do they believe they can twist enough arms to get enough votes to pass this tonight? >> reporter: fabulous question this evening and one that is very hard to answer at this moment. i can tell you, let me just give you the lay of the land what you can probably see a little bit of, john, you were talking about the speaker's office, it's right down the hallway, what we're se
't be a big deal. i'll give you a few seconds to look them in the eye and say, you're wrong. >> yeah, i think you're wrong. now, of course, i don't know for sure. this is unprecedented but there is a $23 billion social security payment due on august 3rd that is not at all clear that there will be enough cash in the treasury to make that payment. so i think david is right. why would you want to take that chance? tp doesn't make sense. not for the social security recipients or for the economy or entire global financial system. >> david walker, the president meets with speaker boehner over the weekend and they are clearly not making any tangible progress. the house will go forward this week and senate will most likely vote on a balanced budget amendment and some other things that simply, to be honest, can't pass or even if they did pass the president would veto. they will move to the mcconnell plan and convince the republicans that they have your vote. do those votes undermine confidence in the market in a deal that might be reached? >> well, i think the markets know that those are not going to
. the big question is and the most important question is what does he want to do? if and when, again, he walks out a free man out of court here in manhattan the next few days, will he want to come back into french politics? and if he does, in what position would that be? will he choose to run for president or will he choose to be kind of the elder statesman if you like in french politics? and that first as an adviser to whoever would be the socialist candidate and then perhaps become prime minister of something. as you see, what is interesting about these polls and has been few of them, two or three, is that french people are very ambivalent about it, about half of them wish him to come back. half of them are not so sure about it. >> right. they're split down the middle pretty much. but let me ask you about this other woman. why -- i'm sure people who haven't followed this case as closely as some of us have, why is she coming out now? some people might think this is opportunistic because she didn't speak out at the time the alleged attempted rape took place in '03. >> it is a very comple
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)